A myriad of systematic and social factors fueled the lack of vaccines in Black and Latino communities

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Elizabeth Griffin, 86, is given her first dose of the Moderna coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine by Anya Harris at Red Hook Neighborhood Senior Center in the Red Hood neighborhood of the Brooklyn borough on February 22, 2021 in New York City. Photo by Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Covid-19 vaccines emerged as a medical breakthrough, but like many other innovations, they have been disproportionately helping white Americans as compared to other racial and ethnic groups.

As of February 2021, a stark Covid-19 vaccine disparity remains. In Delaware, Black people account for 24% of statewide Covid-19 cases, yet only 9% have received the vaccine. Similarly in Colorado, Hispanic people account for 36% of Covid-19 cases, but only 6% have been vaccinated.


Where the United States has floundered, many African countries have succeeded

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The Lagos government conducts community testing and search samples for eligible cases in order to contain Covid-19 cases in Nigeria. Photo: Olukayode Jaiyeola/NurPhoto/Getty Images

The United States has had a less than successful handling of the Covid-19 pandemic. From the government response to individual protests, the American response has abounded with politics and failures that have led to unfortunately high fatalities.

While the U.S. has floundered, other countries have succeeded. Many have praised the response from countries like New Zealand and Singapore, but other countries, particularly in Africa, have done well, too.

For example, Africa’s most populous country, Nigeria, has over 200 million people and confirmed more than 66,000 Covid-19 cases and 1,160 fatalities as of November 2020. The United States, on the other…


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Have you heard of PrEP? Maybe you’ve seen commercials about it or Gilead pamphlets in your medical providers' office? Heard about it via word of mouth but weren’t too sure of the basics about it? Well if that is the case then don’t fear! Here is a short and handy guide for how you can get your hands on the most modern form of HIV protection science has to offer!

What is PrEP?

PrEP is the shorthand for Pre-exposure Prophylaxis medications. PrEP medications are used for preventing HIV. When individuals take a PrEP pill every day as prescribed they have…


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Get Therapy. It’s a comment we hear all the time. We all know and acknowledge the importance of therapy — yet fail to realize how hard it can be to access. Therapy is expensive for the average American. In a country with poor healthcare structure and stagnating wages, it can make trying to access help incredibly frustrating. With the number of financial, region-based, and stigma related hurdles to getting care it’s not surprising that most people don’t reach out for help or aren’t able to stay in care for as long as they would like to. Despite all this, no…


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Get Therapy. It’s a comment we hear all the time. We all know and acknowledge the importance of therapy — yet fail to realize how hard it can be to access. Therapy is expensive for the average American. In a country with poor healthcare structure and stagnating wages, it can make trying to access help incredibly frustrating. With the number of financial, region-based, and stigma related hurdles to getting care it’s not surprising that most people don’t reach out for help or aren’t able to stay in care for as long as they would like to. Despite all this, no…


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Ashley Ezema, an M2 at Northwestern School of Medicine in Egypt!

Where have you traveled to before?

This past couple of years I’ve been really fortunate to travel to many different countries. Since making traveling a priority, I have found myself in spaces that I never would have imagined. My first international trip was to Nigeria to visit family when I was around 12. I didn’t leave the U.S. again for many more years until I visited Tanzania the summer before my sophomore year of college. The summer before junior year I went on a solo trip where I hopped around Western Europe. Soon after I did a study abroad program…


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Dr. Chesahna Kindred-Weaver is a board-certified dermatologist based in Howard County. She was raised in the Southern California area and got her BA from the University of Southern California. She got her MD and her MBA from the University of Cincinnati.

She is the founder of the Onyx Medical Society, which is an organization catered to Black Physicians in the Maryland area. She is also the Chair of the Dermatology section of the National Medical Association, which is the largest and oldest organization representing Black physicians in America. She is also a member of the Women’s Dermatological Society.

Beyond increasing…


Why All Healthcare Should be Trauma Informed Care

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Trigger Warning: This piece will mention various types of trauma.

This June, Ezi Health will be having a series called Talk to Me about TIC on Trauma Informed Care. This piece will be the first of the series and offers a short intro to Trauma Informed Care and Why it Matters

Trauma informed care, or TIC, is a healthcare approach that provides care with the acknowledgment that any patient may have experienced trauma at some point in their life. TIC based providers are trained to address how the traumatic experiences their patients have can influence health ailments they experience. …


Meet Michelle Kihara, a Kenyan-American who just finished her first year of medical school!

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Michelle Kihara University of Minnesota School of Medicine ‘22

What was your journey to medical school like?

I think I have always known I was interested in a field where I would positively impact people’s lives. I took an interest in Public Health as an undergraduate student and initially thought I would go down that career path. I learned about health disparities in the US and around the world and thought that I could make a living out of serving underserved populations. While public health is still important, it is really difficult to see the…


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Our amazing co-creator Chase

Chase Alston is co-creator of Ezi Health. She is a native of the DMV area. She graduated from Johns Hopkins University in 2017 and Johns Hopkins School of Public Health in 2018 where she received a masters in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and concentrated in Maternal & Child Health and the Life Course.

Chase is an activist at heart and is heavily involved in community activism through partnerships with local grassroots organizations
aimed at promoting health equity and decreasing instances of sexual violence.

Chase is currently the manager of the Power Project, which operates out of Chase Brexton Health Care…

Tiffany Onyejiaka

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